Why does empty nesting sometimes lead to divorce?

Not all marriages succeed, and many unions end up legally dissolving. Married people in Delaware are not immune from marriage breakdowns, and even couples who’ve been together for many years may file for divorce. Is every age group at the same risk for divorce? Some studies suggest that “empty nesters” might be at the highest risk.

Children leave, and a marriage may suffer

An empty nest refers to a home where parents live alone after their children move out. Things may change dramatically when a young person moves out after living at home for two decades or more. Sometimes, changes occur between the parents. The differences might not be apparent or intolerable when children live in the home, but things may fall apart when the children leave.

Incompatibility could turn into an overwhelming problem that spouses can’t overcome. Even if the problems existed for years, caring for a child’s welfare could have kept the parents together. When the child leaves, the marriage might start to fracture.

Addressing the problems of an empty nest

Many signs indicate that a marriage could be heading toward a breakup. Lack of communication, spending less time together and consistently arguing would not indicate a healthy relationship. One spouse may spend so much time with hobbies and other pursuits that the household’s finances suffer. That could be another source of tension as one spouse begins to spend more time away from the other.

Mental and physical abuse might start, creating a dangerous situation for the victim. Leaving home then becomes a matter of personal safety for the person suffering from abuse.

Empty nest spouses may discover their marriage starts to fall apart once children leave home. Speaking with a family law attorney about filing for divorce might become a necessary step.